Randy Orton's Functional Training at Emerge, Day 2

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Day 2 of Randy’s functional workouts included mostly multi-planar, movement specific exercises designed to tax the core as a whole.  A few exercises at the end were designed to be more core specific.

1) 2 Bosu TRX power push ups– 2 bosus stacked blue side touching in the middle, feet in trx, holding on to top bosu while plyometrically pushing up and off the bottom bosu.  4×10

2) Incline med ball push ups– With legs elevated on a bar set 5-6 feet off ground, place both hands on individual med balls.  Keep your body in a rigid plank and perform push ups. 3×12

3)  Towel tricep extension/ Towel middle back row– SUPERSET- With a rope draped over a smith bar, hold onto bottom of towel in a plank and extend ONLY the elbow to push with triceps.  With towel in the same position, hang from bottom of towel at a 45 degree angle and row to bar with elbows up. 4×12 each

4)Ball Pike– Planking on ball, hands on floor.  Flex hip into “teepee” shape explosively.  See video in instructional video blog. 4×10

5) Planking stool/dumbbell up down plank– In a planking position, and with a dumbbell in each hand, place hands on either side of a low stool and walk one hand at a time to the top while maintaining a flat back. 3×6 each side. Reference video in instructional exercise blog.

6) V up position med rotate and slam– in a v up position, rotate explosively and throw med ball into ground through your rotation, not arms. 4×10 each side.

The focus was first on movement mechanics moving into VELOCITY.

For Randys first workout, click here.

For exercise database, click here.

Running Another Half Marathon in the Fall

My goal is simple – I want to be FIT! I also enjoy competing against myself when I run. I’m still plugging away striving to meet my fitness/running goals. If you’re an aging boomer like me, every step forward towards greater fitness can be a surprise and a marvel. Being a personal trainer and a runner keeps me focused on being stronger & better – despite the fact that aging is detrimental to my health. I know one thing for sure, I have increased my quality of life with each birthday both physically and mentally. Just knowing that I am the best I can be gives me a sense of wellbeing that I treasure.

I’m getting ready to run a half marathon in the Fall, so I’m working my way back into a more structured training program. I’m leaning towards the Cow Bell Half Marathon. I’m feeling a little scared because I failed to meet my time goal in my last half marathon this past spring and I don’t like to fail. The upside is that I see the failure as “feedback” which helps me determine what I’ll be doing different with my training and during the run this Fall. I’ll also continue to take advantage of the expertise and support I get from my personal trainer, my son and my daughter (running coach).

I work out twice a week with my personal trainer for an hour where we focus on functional training, strength, core (balance) and enhancing my running ability which I love because running has become a spiritual experience for me as well as a chance to compete against myself. My cardio of choice is my running which I do 4 times a week, doubling one running day with a personal training day so that I have 2 days off a week. These cardio/fitness runs will become the times that I do my training runs which will be a variety of tempo, VO2 max, distance and easy runs. Recovery, rest and flexibility have become as much a part of my fitness regime as any workout. As I tell my clients, I try to tune into my body which tells me how far I can go with my workout on any given day. Sometimes I go into a workout thinking I’ll be lucky if I last 10 minutes and “low and behold”, I’m moving through, whether it be with my personal trainer, on the treadmill or outside running. Other days my body says “modify” and that could mean a little less intensity, a little less time or any number of modifications that just bring me through the workout. This morning at 8:00 a.m. my body told me 5 miles running outdoors in this heat was enough. The important thing is that I “START”, no matter how much my mind and body tell me “no” I try to follow the cues that my body gives me and before I know it, my workout is done. It is hard, but “if it wasn’t hard everybody would do it, and it’s the hard that makes it great”. (A League of Their Own)

Although I’m not among the majority of personal trainers, being 57, I’m probably among a growing population of middle agers who want to avoid future physical and mental health issues that will drain my savings, steal my quality of life and perhaps even bankrupt our country. I contribute a lot of my drive and ability as a personal trainer to my clients and colleagues. They inspire me with their determination and drive to stay accountable and active even when they hit those plateaus where their heart and soul just isn’t in it. Most of them have figured out that it’s not in the perfection, but in the fact that they don’t quit that they find their own personal success. “This too shall pass” are some of the most valuable words of wisdom I can think to pass on to my clients when life just gets tough. Most of my clients know that it’s a waste of valuable energy to over think and explain all the reasons we are not the perfect specimen that our original goals dictated we should be. We know that if we are honest with ourselves and value ourselves enough to never give up on ourselves that success is ours!

At Emerge, I work primarily with young adults who are so smart and innovative in their field that it keeps me on my toes and compels me to educate myself on a daily basis. I’m grateful that the upside of being my age is knowing that I can learn so much from others young or old. I’ve done enough hard stuff in my life, so I try to spend very little time learning things the hard way when I have resources right in front of me that can provide the knowledge and expertise I need. Knowing this and exploiting this tends to come with age. I, like all the other trainers at Emerge, work with a diversified clientel. I think this is part of what creates the “magic” of Emerge, magic being a workout environment that is superior and innovative at every level whether were providing service to a professional/Olympian/highschool athlete, or someone like me who wants to lose/maintain my weight, while doing what I can to minimize loss of lean muscle mass, build strength, flexibility, and balance and yes, keep plugging away with my running. Fitness and being the best we can be, regardless of individual goals, is the underlying connection for all of us at Emerge.

Eating healthy and getting fatter?

In my ten years of personal training hundreds of clients, I have had the following discussion many, many times:

PT: Alright, I understand your number one goal here is to lose weight, primarily body fat, correct?

Client: Yes

PT: Ok, the first thing to look at no matter your goal, but especially this one, is your diet.

Client: Oh, trust ME, I eat healthy. 

PT: Ok, lets hear your average days diet, from breakfast to bedtime.

At this point the client will give a rundown of an average day and, yes, it is full of very healthy food choices.

And then I explain that they can expect to gain steadily unless their activity level raises dramatically.

You see, it  is possible to eat yourself obese with very healthy foods.

This is because, at the end of the day, it is not WHAT you eat, but HOW MUCH you eat.  If you eat more calories than your body uses during the day, you will gain weight.  If you eat less, you will lose.

It is popular lately for people to claim they do not count calories, because what matters most is just eating healthy.

True.  But not for weight loss.

When someone is eating something they KNOW is bad, they tend to be very aware of the caloric value of that food.  That’s a good thing.  Even though it’s not conducive to weight loss, at LEAST they are aware of exactly what they are doing.

That is usually not the case for those under the illusion that simply eating healthy will drop pounds on the scale.  Most tend to disregard quantity and nutrition information when eating bowls of fruit, nuts, oils and other “healthy” food items.  After all, its health food!

Salads are the perfect example.   A salad like the California Chicken Salad at O’Charley’s sounds great on paper.  Romaine lettuce, walnuts, cranberries, mandarin oranges, grilled chicken and balsamic vinegrette dressing sounds pretty healthy.  It’s also 800+ calories.  Thats almost half a days calories for the average “diet.”  Those calories can add up fast.

When losing weight, you MUST BE aware of total caloric intake.  You can certainly eat healthy, but the calories for the day must put you at a deficit or you will not lose weight. Period.

Matt Pirtle, MA, CSCS

Instructional Exercise Video Database

Click the ATP logo to view the listed set of exercises.

The first exercises covered in the EMERGE instructional video series are:

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1) the barbell deadlift

2) the hang clean

3) the jumping shrug

4) the barbell squat

5) the barbell lunge

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1) The cable wood chop

2) The reverse crunch

3) The ball crunch

4) The plank

5) V up dumbbell rotation

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1) The dumbbell stool up/down plank

2) The kettlebell Hitch

3) The ball russian twist

4) The ball pike

5) The jumping RDL

Burn More in Less Time on The WOODWAY CURVE treadmill

New to Emerge is the Woodway Curve treadmill.  Woodway, the leader in durable and cutting edge treadmill technology, developed a user-powered treadmill that is joint friendly and allows for high speed training as well as low intensity, low impact walking. Check it out at Emerge!

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The CURVE treadmill burns up to 30% more calories than conventional motorized treadmills because the user is actually powering the running surface, thus engaging more muscle groups and achieving a superior workout. Research studies have proven that users are able to reach similar cardiovascular exercise levels and caloric burn walking on the CURVE treadmill in comparison to running on conventional motorized units.

Matt Pirtle, MA, CSCS

Rams Jason Brown and Drew Miller talk about their training at Emerge

 

 

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This is the second installment of a series of blogs focusing on the professional athletes training at Emerge, including what they consider the most important part of their diet and their training regimen.

This week Rams offensive lineman Jason Brown and Drew Miller answer a few questions….

The six questions (and answers) are as follows:

1) What do you consider the most important part of your diet as an athlete?

Jason: Making sure I get 1 gram of protein per pound of lean body mass from lean, organic meats.

Drew: Maintaining weight while eating healthy.

2) As a professional football player, what is the most important part of your training regimen?

Jason: Conditioning. Most people don’t realize how grueling playing for a whole game is, between 60 and 80 plays. Sustaining through a long season can be tough.

Drew: Training explosively and keeping my legs strong.

3) What is one shared characteristic of athletes who make it to the next level.

Jason: Work ethic and mental and physical readiness.

Drew: A dedication to training and working hard

4) What supplement do you consider the most important part of your diet?

Jason: Omega 3 fish oils for reducing inflammation and joint health, which is key for offensive lineman.

Drew: Protein for muscle gain before bed and recovery after workout.

5) How important is functional training in finding success in your sport?

Jason: Fundamental. If you can’t utilize the full potential of your body and have it carry over to the field, your strength becomes useless.

Drew: Extremely. Being able to create power in the positons you find yourself in on the field is the most important thing you can do.

 6) What is your most hated exercise at Emerge?

Jason: A crawling plank while dragging the sled with your legs.

Drew: A lateral walking surrender with a front loaded barbell. (10x worse than a walking lunge)

Next week the Ram’s Jacob bell and Bradley Fletcher will be on the hot seat answering the same set of questions.

Matt Pirtle, MA, CSCS

Randy Orton: Day One Functional Training at Emerge

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Randy’s workouts have a focus on “function.”  Functional training is simply training for use in an athletic environment or even just in an everyday life environment.  Gains and improvements in functional exercise have a high transfer to gains and improvement in the ring, field, court, or even just functioning in the everyday world.  It’s taking “gym strength” and making it usable outside the gym.  Randy’s functional training program is designed for ring performance, primarily.  Program variables include:

1) Core Strength and Stabilization

2) Postural correction through corrective exercise (flexibility, muscle activation, and muscle inhibition)

3) Multi Planar training on all 3 planes of motion at once, mimicking the demands of his sport.

4) Activation and integration of underactive muscle (waking up sleeping muscle and allowing it to communicate with other muscle)

5) Power (speed) training in multiple planes at once

6) Hypertrophy (keeping the size of the muscle fibers BIG)

The first workout was as follows:

Lower ab activation- 3 sets- 12 reps- a simple reverse crunch, focus on lower back flat against floor, rolling hips back, not lifting through the hip flexors (not a leg lift, a pelvic rotation)

V Up Incline Barbell Press- 3 sets- 12 reps- Sitting in a “v” position, feet off ground, hips flexed, abs flexed, making your body into your own “incline bench” while incline pressing weight

Kettlebell Lateral Squat-Walk with an Extended 35 pound Kettlebell (strength band around ankles)- 3 sets- 10 steps each direction- Primarily for activation of glute medius with and emphasis on core stability

Push Pull Rotate Extend- 3 sets- 6 each side- Working the deep abdominal tissue (TVA) in a plank to start, pushing up into a row, into a rotation and an arm extension all in one quick movement. Full body multi-planar movement with a high core involvement. Brutal.

Waterball Twist and Slam- 3 sets- 15 reps- A small swiss ball with 3 pounds of water gripped tight- Starting in a “v” position rotate from the TRUNK, not arms, and slam the waterball into the ground. The water will move and will attempt to pull you out of your path of motion. Oblique focus with core stability.

Weighted Ball Crunch- 3 sets- 10 reps- FULLY extended over a ball with a 30 pound weight just below chin. Flex neck forward first then follow by lower spine without the ball moving. No hips, just UPPER abs. We will integrate the much stronger hip flexors in later.

Randy has a list of exercises specific to him for movement prep ( before every workout) and a dynamic warmup on the turf as well.

Updated workouts to come!

Matt Pirtle, MA, CSCS

Adam Goldberg and Ryan McKee of the St. Louis Rams talk about training at Emerge

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Ryan McKee

This is the first installment of a series of blogs focusing on the professional athletes training at Emerge, including what they consider the most important part of their diet and their training regimen.

This week Rams offensive lineman Adam Goldberg and Ryan McKee answer a few questions….

The six questions (and answers) are as follows:

1) What do you consider the most important part of your diet as an athlete?

Adam: Really it’s just staying consistently fueled, not having to overeat in one sitting and eating more often instead.

Ryan: For me it’s eating enough clean calories to keep my weight up.

2) As a professional football player, what is the most important part of your training regimen?

Adam: Whatever I’m doing, pushing my personal limits.

Ryan: Challenging my body by putting it in unique positions when training, making your body react to new stimulus.

3) What is one shared characteristic of athletes who make it to the next level.

Adam: Competitiveness

Ryan: Not losing. It’s not always about winning, but focusing on not losing.

4) What supplement do you consider the most important part of your diet?

Adam: Slow burning protein before bed, faster burning protein post workout.

Ryan: Fast burning post workout protein.

5) How important is functional training in finding success in your sport?

Adam: Vital. It’s taking everything you’ve done in the gym and training your body to use it on the field.

Ryan: It’s the most important workout I’ve ever done for football.  You don’t realize how important it is until you see what this kind of training can do for your performance.

6) What is your most hated exercise at Emerge?

Adam: An alternating push up to row to rotate to press from a plank. A full body multi planar exercise. Hands down.

Ryan: Battling ropes and the push up to row to rotate to press from a plank.

Next week the Ram’s Jacob bell and Bradley Fletcher will be on the hot seat answering the same set of questions.

Matt Pirtle, MA, CSCS

Static Stretching can DIMINISH Force Production

 

Reconsider your stretching routine just prior to an event that requires high froce production.  STATIC stretching of a muscle can reduce force production by decreasing neural drive to a muscle. Dynamic warm ups to increase muscle temperature is a better route to prepare the muscle for these tasks.

Check out this article for more info.